Publication

April 1, 2020

Osborn quoted in Bloomberg Law article "3D Printing Ingenuity During Coronavirus Comes With IP Risks"

Bloomberg Law

Michael Best Attorney Lucas Osborn was quoted in Bloomberg Law article “3D Printing Ingenuity During Coronavirus Comes With IP Risks” on April 1, 2020.

Innovators and volunteers are rallying to 3D printing to combat the new coronavirus. But with this ingenuity comes concerns about patent infringement and product safety.

Owners of patents on certain designs of face shields, masks, and ventilator parts could have infringement claims against printers. There is also a risk of lawsuits if supplies are unsafe.

Shortages of masks, gowns, and other protective gear in many cities hit hard by the pandemic have driven innovations. Open-source instructions are readily available, and volunteers are lining up.

More than 4,300 individuals—from Portland, Ore. to Berlin, Germany—have added their names to a Google Doc circulating online with offers to help 3D print medical supplies. Businesses, and even some universities, have also offered help.

“If there’s a patent covering it and you actually 3D print it, then you’re clearly infringing,” said Lucas Osborn, an intellectual property law professor at Campbell University and attorney at Michael Best & Friedrich LLP.

To read the entire Bloomberg Law article, click here.

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